Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae)

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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Technical Information Service [distributor , [Washington, D.C.?], Springfield, VA
Caesalpiniaceae -- Seeds -- Classification, Tropical fruit -- Seeds -- Classification, Legumes -- Seeds -- Classific
StatementCharles R. Gunn
SeriesTechnical bulletin -- no. 1755, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1755
ContributionsUnited States. Agricultural Research Service
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 408 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13566103M

Vadivel, H.K. Biesalski, in Nuts and Seeds in Health and Disease Prevention, Botanical Description. Bauhinia is a large and diverse tropical and subtropical genus comprising approximately species, belonging to the family Leguminosae (Caesalpinioideae).Most of them possess typical bi-lobed leaves.

The genus Bauhinia has recently been divided into four sub-genera: Barklya (1 species. Overview Caesalpinioideae is a botanical name at the rank of subfamily, placed in the large family Fabaceae or name is formed from the generic name is known also as the Peacock Flower family.

The Caesalpinioideae are mainly trees distributed in the moist tropics, but includes such temperate species as the honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos), Kentucky. The genus Sesbania is within the larger family Fabaceae. The Fabaceae are divided into three subfamilies: Mimosoideae (80 genera and 3, species).

Caesalpinioideae ( genera and 2, species). Faboideae ( genera species); The genus Sesbania belongs to the subfamily Faboideae, which has the greatest amount of diversity within the family : Fabaceae. Fruits and Seeds of Genera in the Subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae), Volume II [Joseph H.

Kirkbride, Jr., Charles R. Gunn, and Anna L. Weitzman] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Fruits and Seeds of Genera in the Subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae), Volume IIAuthor: and Anna L. Weitzman Joseph H. Kirkbride, Jr., Charles R. Gunn. Gunn, Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae), U.S.

Dept. Agric., Agric. Res. Service No. Springfield, March. Other articles where Caesalpiniaceae is discussed: Fabales: Classification of Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae (classified as a family, Caesalpiniaceae, by some authorities) is a heterogeneous group of plants with about genera and some 2, species.

The latest classifications show that this subfamily is the most basal lineage among the legumes and the one from which the other two. Using these resources, Gunn prepared and published treatments covering the fruits and seeds for genera of the subfamilies Caesalpinioideae (Gunn ) and Mimosoideae (Gunn ).

This volume, on the faboid legumes, completes the studies for all legume genera. The overall objectives of this bulletin, and of the previous two, were threefold: 1. Gunn, C.R. Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae).

Technical Bulletin, United States Department of Agriculture [ Links ] Gurgel, E.S.C. Morfoanatomia, perfil químico e atividade alelopática de três espécies de Copaifera L. (Leguminosae Caesalpinioideae) nativas da Amazônia. PhD. Fruits and Seeds of Genera in the Subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae) Volume II Joseph H.

Kirkbride, Jr., Charles R. Gunn, and Anna L. Weitzman Kirkbride is a research botanist, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Systematic Botany and Mycology Laboratory, BARC West.

Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae) Port Royal – Springfield: US Department of Agriculture.

Irwin HS, Barneby RC. The American Cassiinae. The traditionally recognised subfamily Mimosoideae is a distinct clade nested within the recircum-scribed Caesalpinioideae and is referred to informally as the mimosoid clade pending a forthcoming formal tribal and/or clade-based classification of the new Caesalpinioideae.

Leucaena is a genus of flowering plants in the mimosoid clade of the subfamily Caesalpinioideae of the legume family contains about 24 species of trees and shrubs, which are commonly known as leadtrees. They are native to the Americas, ranging from Texas in the United States south to Peru.

The generic name is derived from the Greek word λευκός (leukos), meaning "white. Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Mimosoideae (Fabaceae). USDA Tech. Bull. pp. Washington, DC. Gunn, C.R. Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae.

According to Verdcourt, the illustration of G. humblotianum seeds on page of World Guide to Tropical Drift Seeds and Fruits is misidentified as Mucuna: "It also matched a drawing in C. Gunn & J.V.

Dennis' book on drift seeds (World Guide to Tropical Drift Seeds and Fruits, New York, fig. 66/A-D), also incorrectly captioned Mucuna sp. Using these resources, he prepared and published treatments covering the fruits and seeds for genera of subfamilies Caesalpinioideae and Mimosoideae (Gunn,).

The third and final volume, covering subfamily Faboideae, was prepared by Kirkbride, Gunn, and Weitzman (). Note that identifications cannot be carried out when all taxa are included, because some genera lack fruit or seed data, or both. Select a subfamily: Caesalpinioideae, Mimsoideae, or Faboideae.

This button executes the character for Fabaceae subfamilies, and includes the taxa of a selected subfamily, Caesalpinioideae, Mimsoideae, or Faboideae.

Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae) (OCoLC) Online version: Kirkbride, Joseph H. Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae) (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

Erythrina flabelliformis, other Erythrina species, seeds contain the alkaloids erysodin and erysovin; Subfamily Caesalpinioideae.

Petalostylis cassioides: % tryptamine, DMT, etc. in leaves and stems; Petalostylis labicheoides, Tryptamines in leaves and stems, MAO's up to % [unreliable source?] Lauraceae. Hymenaea L. is a genus in the flowering plant family Fabaceae (legume family).

Of fourteen living species in the genus, all but one are native to the tropics of the Americas, with one additional species (Hymenaea verrucosa) on the east coast of authors place the African species in a separate monotypic genus, Trachylobium. In the Neotropics, Hymenaea is distributed through the.

Gunn CR () Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae). US Dept Agric Tech Bull – Google Scholar Lersten NR, Gunn CR, Brubaker CL () Comparative morphology of the lens on legume (Fabaceae) seeds, with emphasis on species in subfamilies Caesalpinioideae and Mimosoideae.

Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae). U.S.D.A. Tech. Bull.pp. Washington, DC. Gunn, C.R., Wiersema, J.H., Kirkbride, J.H. Jr., and Ritchie, C.A. Families and genera of spermatophytes recognized by the Agricultural Research Service.

Gunn, C.R. () Fruits and seeds of genera in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae). United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin1 – Hagon, M.W. () The action of temperature fluctuations on hard seeds of subterranean clover. Overview Some classification systems, for example the Cronquist system, treat the Fabaceae in a narrow sense, raising the Mimisoideae to the rank of family as Angiosperm Phylogeny Group treats Fabaceae in the broad sense.

Mimosoideae are a subfamily of the flowering plant family Fabaceae (Leguminosae) characterized by flowers with small petals and. Fruit valve venation is unknown and sutures are relatively thickened (Plate IV, 1–2), with no attached wing found.

Seed chambers, ca. mm in diameter, are ovate to elliptic and are no less than 4 in number (Plate IV, 1–2). Seeds, in 1 series and not overlapping, oriented with their length perpendicular to the fruit length (Plate IV, 1–2).

Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae Golden Rain tree Origin: South Asia. Cassia is a large genus with some species, among which are a number of highly attractive flowering trees, this is a medium to large tree with ovate, pointed leaflets; when these drop, usually in the dry season, masses of bright gold flower clusters appear on almost every branch.

Abstract. According to the literature, the seeds of Chamaecrista lack pleurograms and have pitted testas aligned in vertical lines. Preliminary observations ha.

Gunn, C.R. (): Fruits and seeds of genera in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae).

Description Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae) PDF

United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin Number Washington,DC, United States Department of Agriculture. Gutterman, Y.

(): Seed germination in. Gunn CR () Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae).

USDA Technical BulletinBeltsville, MD, USA. Herendeen PS () The fossil history of the Leguminosae from the Eocene of southeastern North America. STOMATA ON SEEDS AND FRUITS OF BAUHINIA (LEGUMINOSAE: CAESALPINIOIDEAE)' SEANNA R. RUGENSTEIN AND NELS R. LERSTEN Department of Botany, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa ABSTRACT Seeds of 45 species of Bauhinia (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) were studied by scanning electron microscopy.

List Of Fruits.

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This list of fruits names more than 90 common culinary fruits. It includes what are generally regarded as edible fruits and their close relatives.

The definition of botanical fruit would exclude some of these and include other foods that we think of as vegetables. Seeds from dehiscent fruits usually develop hardened seed coats that provide the mechanical protection of the seed.

In indehiscent fruits other than berries, it is the entire fruit wall (pericarp, e.g.

Details Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Fabaceae) PDF

in nuts) or part of it (usually the inner layer, called endocarp, e.g. in drupes) that provides the mechanical protection of the seed.The fruit is technically called a legume or pod.

It is composed of a single seed-bearing carpel that splits open along two seams. Legume fruits come in an enormous variety of shapes and sizes, including indehiscent pods that do not split open.

Of all the legumes, the peanut is especially fascinating because it develops below the ground.A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.